A-Z: L

Building
Construction & Landscape Building
1603 Westbrooke
Lawrence, KS 66046

Part of the Facilities Services Complex, it has offices and shops for carpenters, painters, plumbers, steamfitters, lock shop, moving crew, storage, recycling facilities, etc.

Building
Learned Hall
1530 W. 15th St.
Lawrence, KS 66045

Civil engineering was among the earliest courses taught at KU; electrical engineering was added in 1887, and in 1891 the School of Engineering was founded. Its first dean was Frank O. Marvin, son of third chancellor James Marvin. Departments of chemical, mechanical, mining and architectural engineering were added during his tenure, and in 1927 the school was renamed to Engineering and Architecture. In 1909, Marvin Hall was completed to house the School of Engineering.

Building
Lewis Residence Hall
1530 Engel Road
Lawrence, KS 66045

This hall was partly funded by the estate of Lawrence merchant and philanthropist Luther N. Lewis (1865-1933) and his widow, Lucene Barker Lewis, who died in 1956; both attended KU in the 1880s. It opened in spring 1960 and housed 432 women; major renovations were done in 1998-99. It now houses about 280 men and women; each floor, or “house,” honors a person or tradition of excellence at KU. In 1983 Ekdahl Dining Commons adjoining Lewis was opened.

280 men and women​

Building
Library Annex
1880 Westbrooke Drive
Lawrence, KS 66044

The annex, designed by PGAV Architects of Westwood and opened in 2006, can house up to 1.6 million volumes from the KU Libraries’ collections. The climate-controlled storage area has nearly 7,900 square feet of shelving in units 35 feet tall. Materials stored here are cataloged and retrievable on request within 24 hours.

Building
Lied Center
1600 Stewart Drive
Lawrence, KS 66045

The center, which opened in September 1993, was built largely with $10 million from the Lied Foundation Trust and is dedicated to Ernst M. and Ida K. Lied, parents of Ernst F. Lied (d. 1980). The younger Lied attended KU 1923-25; he owned a car dealership in Omaha and was a real-estate investor in Las Vegas.

Building
Lindley Hall

Completed in 1943, the limestone hall was named for Ernest H. Lindley, chancellor 1920-39, who died shortly after retiring. It is sited on the crest of Mount Oread traversed by the Oregon Trail. Its Art Moderne design was by State Architect Roy Stookey, and limestone bas reliefs are by sculptor Bernard “Poco” Frazier. Its construction was delayed and complicated by World War II material shortages, which were alleviated only after Chancellor Deane W.

Artwork
Lindley Hall Relief Sculptures
Lindley Hall
Lawrence, KS

Bernard “Poco” Frazier. 1942

Elements of Art Moderne and Art Deco combine on the facade of Lindley Hall. Two three-story columns mark the main entry, and three inset limestone bas-reliefs of geologists and engineers are executed in a socialist-realist style.

Building
Lippincott Hall
1410 Jayhawk Blvd.
Lawrence, KS 66045

This Greco-Roman columned stone building was designed by State Architect John F. Stanton and dedicated Nov. 3, 1905. By student request it was named for James Woods Green, for 41 years (1879-1919) dean of the School of Law. In 1978 a new, much enlarged law building was erected west of Murphy Hall on 15th Street. The old hall was renamed for Joshua Lippincott, the fourth chancellor, on Oct. 23, 1979; it now houses the Office of Study Abroad, the Applied English Center and the Wilcox Classical Museum. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.


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One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
1 of 9 public universities with outstanding study abroad programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
$260.5 million in externally funded research expenditures
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times