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Building
Grace Pearson Scholarship Hall
1335 Louisiana St.
Lawrence, KS 66044

Funded by the gift of Joseph R. and Gertrude Sellards Pearson and named in honor of his sister, it is adjacent to and mirrors Douthart Hall, also designed by Raymond Coolidge of Topeka. The three-story brick building opened in fall 1955 as a women’s hall, but in fall 1960 it became a men’s hall. It now houses 48 men in four-person suites.

Building
Green Hall
1535 W. 15th St.
Lawrence, KS 66045

This five-story building west of Naismith Drive and Murphy Hall opened for classes Oct. 17, 1977, and was dedicated Feb. 20-21, 1978. It retained the name of the 1905 hall built on Jayhawk Boulevard to house the School of Law and named in honor of Dean James W. “Uncle Jimmy” Green. It was designed by Lawrence R. Good & Associates of Lawrence; in 1987 former Chancellor and Mrs. W. Clarke Wescoe donated “Tai Chi Figure,” a large sculpture by Zhu Ming, which was sited near the hall’s entrance.

Artwork
Green Memorial / "Uncle Jimmy" Green
Front of Lippincott Hall
Lawrence, KS

Daniel Chester French, 1924

James Woods Green (1842-1919) was the first head of the KU Department of Law and the first dean when it became the School of Law in 1889; he served from 1878 until his death Nov. 4, 1919. A group of alumni and friends quickly formed an association to create a statue in memory of the beloved teacher and mentor.

Building
Hall Center for the Humanities
900 Sunnyside Ave.
Lawrence, KS 66045

The center, dedicated April 9, 2005, incorporates nine limestone arches and the walls from KU’s oldest surviving structure, the 1887 Powerhouse designed by John G. Haskell. The center includes a 120-seat conference room, seminar room and offices for Hall Center staff and research fellows. It was built with a $4.07 million gift from the Hall Family Foundation and state and private funds.

Building
Hambleton Hall
1930 Constant Ave.
Lawrence, KS 66047

This 1983 addition to Moore Hall includes an auditorium seating 45 and is named for William W. Hambleton, alumnus/faculty member, state geologist and KGS director 1970-87. It houses the Publication Sales division of the KGS, the Data Access and Support program and public data and library services.

Building
Hashinger Residence Hall
1632 Engel Road
Lawrence, KS 66045

This 1962 Daisy Hill residence hall, named for Margaret Battenfeld Hashinger, houses about 370 men and women since major renovations in 2005-06. It has a performing-arts focus and offers studio, rehearsal and performance space for residents.

Building
Haworth Hall
1200 Sunnyside Ave.
Lawrence, KS 66045

The first Haworth Hall opened in fall 1909 and housed the departments of geology and mineralogy, whose chair 1892-1920 was Erasmus Haworth. An 1881 and 1884 alumnus who founded the Kansas Geological Survey in 1894, Haworth who was known to his students as “Daddy.” 

Building
Higuchi Hall
2101 Constant Ave.
Lawrence, KS 66047

Named for Takeru Higuchi, Regents Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Pharmacy 1967-87, the building was completed in 1969; major renovations were done in 1989. It now houses the Kansas Biological Survey (KBS), a research and service unit whose programs and activities range from aquatic and terrestrial ecology to remote sensing.

KBS research units housed in Higuchi include the Central Plains Center for Bioassessment, the Kansas Applied Remote Sensing Program, the KU Field Station, the Native Medicinal Plant Research Program and Reservoir Assessment.

 

Building
Hill Engineering Research & Development Center
2035 Becker Drive 66045
Lawrence , KS 66045

Completed in June 2013 by the School of Architecture, Design & Planning’s Studio 804 design/build class, this advanced research facility houses KU EcoHawks, a School of Engineering student program that focuses on sustainable energy approaches for automobiles and infrastructure. The open structure, divided into two enclosed pods and one open-air pod, incorporates aluminum recycled from a Wichita airplane manufacturer and glass from a Kansas City, Mo., building project, Aerogel insulating panels, and photovoltaic panels on the entry canopy.

Building
Hill Engineering Research & Development Center
2035 Becker Drive
Lawrece, KS 66045

Completed in June 2013 by the School of Architecture, Design & Planning’s Studio 804 design/build class, this advanced research facility houses KU EcoHawks, a School of Engineering student program that focuses on sustainable energy approaches for automobiles and infrastructure. The open structure, divided into two enclosed pods and one open-air pod, incorporates aluminum recycled from a Wichita airplane manufacturer and glass from a Kansas City, Mo., building project, Aerogel insulating panels, and photovoltaic panels on the entry canopy.

Building
Hilltop Child Development Center
1605 Irving Hill Road
Child Care Drive
Lawrence, KS 66045

This $3.3 million, 18,000-square-foot facility opened south of Burge Union in August 2000. It offers day care and educational programs for toddlers through sixth-graders on site as well as programs at three Lawrence elementary schools. Children of students, faculty, staff and affiliates may enroll.

Outdoor Recreation
Hoglund ballpark
1545 Allen Fieldhouse Drive
Lawrence, KS 66045

The first baseball field on this site south of Allen Fieldhouse, built in 1958, was named for Earnest Q. Quigley, KU athletic director 1944-50, a National League umpire and a football and basketball official.

Building
Horejsi Family Athletics Center
1550 Allen Fieldhouse Drive
Lawrence, KS 66045

The 16,500-square-foot facility, completed in 1999 at the southwest corner of the fieldhouse, was funded by Stewart Horejsi of Salina, a 1959 graduate, and named for his family. It houses volleyball practice and competition courts, enlarged and remodeled in a 2009 project at Allen Fieldhouse.

Artwork
Icarus
Southeast entrance to Nichols Hall
Lawrence, KS

Charles Umlauf, 1964

Building
International House
704 W. 12th St.
Lawrence, KS 66044

International House, a residence for visiting scholars, was dedicated Feb. 9, 2008. Formerly the home of longtime business professor Frank Pinet and his family, the house was given to the university in 2001 and had been a residence and offices for visiting faculty and others.

Artwork
Interstate 70
Marvin Grove
Lawrence, KS

Richard Hollander, 1981

The Spencer Museum of Art purchased this abstract sculpture in 1981, after it had been on loan. Kansas City artist Richard Hollander (1911-91) fabricated the work of welded steel painted black in 1970; it is 21.5 feet long, 5 feet high and 4 feet wide. Its three groupings of discs connected by rectangular bars represent the experience of traveling on the interstate highway. It is sited in Marvin Grove about midway between Bailey Hall on the south and the art museum on the north.

Artwork
Jayhawk
Templin Hall
Entrance to KU Visitor Center
Lawrence, KS

Flat-panel bronze by Mike Elwell 
Gift, Class of 1999

Elwell is an alumnus who holds a 1964 undergraduate degree and a 1967 law degree.

Artwork
Jayhawk/Academic Jay
In front of Strong Hall
Lawrence, KS

Elden C. Tefft, 1958

This distinctive Jayhawk was commissioned by the Class of 1956 and designed and cast by Elden C. Tefft, professor of sculpture. He has said he was inspired by the sharp-beaked “fighting Jayhawks” that were mascots from 1929 to 1946, but the statue also has been called “the Pterodactyl.”

Building
Jayhawker Towers Apartments
1603 W. 15th St.
Lawrence, KS 66045

Towers A-D: 6 floors, basement
Tower E: 2 floors
800 men and women

This apartment complex, opened Sept. 30, 1969, was bought by KU in 1980. It houses 800 single nontraditional, upper-class or transfer students in four towers; a fifth tower has a service center, commons and Academic Resource Center. All apartments are two-bedroom and shared by either two or four residents. The project, designed by Woodward & Cape of Dallas, was the brainchild of alumni K.S. Adams, W.W. Keeler, and Stanley Learned.

Building
Joseph R. Pearson Hall
1122 West Campus Road
Lawrence, KS 66045

One of five residence and scholarship halls funded by a 1945 bequest from Joseph R. and Gertrude Sellards Pearson, it was designed by State Architect John E. Brink and opened in January 1959 as a men’s hall; it closed in the early 1990s. In 2000, after major additions and renovations costing $14.1 million and designed by Gould Evans Associates, the School of Education moved in. Founded in 1909, the school had been housed in Bailey Hall since 1956; before that it was scattered in several campus buildings.

Building
K.K. Amini Scholarship Hall
1318 Louisiana St.
Lawrence, KS 66044

Named for Koli K. "K.K." Amini, a 1949 petroleum engineering graduate whose gift of $1 million funded its construction, the hall was built in 1992. It houses 50 men in three- or four-person suites. Gould Evans Associates of Lawrence designed it and its twin, Margaret Amini Scholarship Hall.

Building
Kansas Union
1301 Jayhawk Blvd.
Lawrence, KS 66045

The need for a central meeting, entertainment and food service building had been discussed for several years before planning began for a union and stadium to honor the students, faculty, staff and alumni who died in World War I. Fund-raising for the Million Dollar Drive began in late 1920, and by late 1921 the first sections of a new stadium were completed on the site of McCook Field below Marvin Grove.

Artwork
Korean War Memorial
Memorial Drive
Lawrence, KS 66045

This memorial, honoring 44 members of the university community who died in that conflict, was dedicated April 16, 2005. The brick and stone terrace overlooks Potter Lake west of the campanile. Its centerpiece is a 7-foot copper sculpture, “Korean Cranes Rising,” by design professor Jon Havener. The four entwined cranes, ancient symbols of peace in the Korean culture, represent the four nations in the conflict: the United States, China, North Korea and South Korea.

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Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
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