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Building
Moore Hall
1930 Constant Ave.
Lawrence, KS 66047

This building, housing the Kansas Geological Survey, was designed by Thomas, Johnson, Isley and dedicated Feb. 2, 1973. It is named for Raymond C. Moore (1892-1974), state geologist, KGS director 1916-54 and a faculty member 1916-62; he was a Summerfield Distinguished Professor, chair of geology and a leading scholar/editor in invertebrate paleontology. It houses the KGS geohydrology and exploration services sections, along with Public Outreach and administration.

Artwork
Moses
Front of Smith Hall
Lawrence, KS

Elden C. Tefft, 1982

This filigreed bronze, evoking the image on the University of Kansas seal, was planned to complement the stained-glass window “Burning Bush,” designed by Smith Hall architect Charles L. Marshall of Topeka. The window was donated by Mr. and Mrs. L. Allyn Laybourn in memory of his parents, the Rev. Lemuel and Susan M. Laybourn, and executed by Jacoby Studios of St. Louis.

Building
Mount Oread

The curving limestone ridge where KU’s main campus was built received this name from Ferdinand Fuller on Aug. 1, 1854, when he and the other settlers in the New England Emigrant Aid Society arrived. The contingent was funded by abolitionists in Boston and the region and sent to the Kansas Territory to ensure that it joined the Union as a free state.

Building
Multidisciplinary Research Building
2030 Becker Drive
Lawrence, KS 66047

Construction began on the $40 million, three-story research center in fall 2004, and it was dedicated March 6, 2006. Housed in its 106,000 square feet are about 200 researchers, faculty, students and staff in engineering, chemistry, biology, geology and other natural sciences who do collaborative research in bioinformatics, drug discovery and nanoscience, among other fields.

Building
Murphy Hall
1530 Naismith Drive
Lawrence, KS 66045

The School of Fine Arts was founded in 1891, combining the Department of Music, established in 1877, and the Department of Art, established in 1885. Between 1893 and 1917 the school was housed in the increasingly decrepit North College, the university's first building, until it was declared unfit for occupation.

Building
National Register of Historic Places

In April 2013, the University of Kansas Historic District was added to the National Register of Historic Places, after being listed on the Register of Historic Kansas Places in February 2013.

Building
Nichols Hall
2335 Irving Hill Road
Lawrence, KS 66045

The $2.4 million hall, designed by Hollis & Miller of Overland Park, opened in fall 1971 and was dedicated Sept. 29, 1972. It was named for Raymond F. Nichols (1903-99), 12th chancellor (1972-73) and chancellor emeritus, journalism alumnus (1926 and 1928) and longtime KU administrator (1929-73).

Building
Nunemaker Center
1506 Engel Road
Lawrence, KS 66045
Built in 1971 with a gift of $415,000 from Irene Nunemaker, a 1922 graduate in journalism who became a cosmetics executive and consultant, it was designed by 1928 architecture alumnus Clarence Kivett of Kivett & Myers of Kansas City, Mo. It houses the University Honors Program; staff offices; class, conference and meeting rooms; reference/reading area; student kitchen; meeting room; and lounge.
Building
Oliver Residence Hall
1815 Naismith Drive
Lawrence, KS 66045

Opened in 1966 as a freshman women’s hall, it is named for the first chancellor, R.W. Oliver, in honor of the university’s centennial. It now houses 660 men and women, coed by wing, in two-person rooms. It has a dining center commons.

(Naismith Hall, across the street east of Oliver, is a private residence hall for men and women.)

 

Artwork
Oregon Trail Marker
Jayhawk Boulevard at West Campus Road
Lawrence, KS

The bronze medallion of this marker is 16.5 inches in diameter and bears the image of a conestoga wagon pulled by oxen and guided by a pioneer. The work of sculptors J.E. and L.G. Fraser, it is mounted on a limestone plinth about 4 feet tall and nearly 6 feet long. The whole is surrounded by a low ovoid stone wall; plantings and a flagpole complete the marker.

Building
Oswald Residence Hall
1620 Engel Road
Lawrence, KS 66045

The southern of two five-story, freshman-focused residence halls designed by Treanor Architects of Lawrence, it houses about 350 men and women in single-, two- and four-person suites; it is part of a quadrangle with Self, Templin, Lewis, Ellsworth, and Hashinger halls. Connecting it to the new Self Residence Hall to the north is Daisy Hill Commons, an academic service center and community kitchen that provides gathering spaces for all residence-hall students to socialize and study. The $47.8 million project opened in fall 2015.

Artwork
Owl, The
Spooner Hall
Lawrence, KS

The inscription on the hall’s portico reads: “Whoso findeth wisdom findeth life,” and a sandstone owl, the symbol of wisdom, sits in a niche on the gable. The owl may have been designed by the Spooner architect, Henry van Brunt (1832-1903), a partner in the Kansas City, Mo., firm of Van Brunt & Howe. He was an 1854 graduate of Harvard University and a student of Richard Morris Hunt, the most notable American proponent of the Gothic Revival and Renaissance Revival styles.

Building
Parker Hall
1930 Constant Ave.
Lawrence, KS 66047

This building, also attached to Moore Hall, was dedicated March 26, 1968, as a U.S. Geological Survey facility. The USGS moved to other offices in 1989, and Parker now houses KGS offices including energy research and stratigraphic research. It is named for Glenn L. Parker, an alumnus and chief hydraulic engineer for the USGS 1939-46.

Building
Parrott Athletic Center
1555 Irving Hill Road
Lawrence, KS 66045

The Parrott facility, completed in 1970 and renovated in 1993, houses senior administrative staff, business offices, the Williams Educational Fund offices, and Media Relations offices.

Building
Pearson Scholarship Hall
1426 Alumni Place
Lawrence, KS 66044

Gertrude Sellards Pearson (1880-1968), a 1901 alumna, and her husband, Joseph R. Pearson (1880-1955), of Corsicana, Texas, donated $200,000 in June 1945 for five residence and scholarship halls. Raymond Coolidge, a 1924 graduate and former Kansas state architect, designed this brick building. It houses 48 men in two-person suites and opened in fall 1952; a renovation was completed in 1992. The hall is named for a niece of Pearson’s.

Building
Pharmaceutical Chemistry Laboratories
2097 Constant Ave.
Lawrence, KS 66047
This one-story building of laboratories and offices was built in 1968 and acquired by the university from KU Endowment in June 1991. It is part of the Higuchi Biosciences Center.
Artwork
Phog Allen
Allen Fieldhouse
Lawrence, KS

Kwan Wu, 1997

This bronze of KU coaching great Forrest C. “Phog” Allen, dressed in an athlete’s sweatsuit and holding a basketball, is 8 feet 8 inches tall. It is mounted facing east on a granite base at the entrance to the Booth Family Hall of Athletics on the east side of Allen Fieldhouse.

Courtyard
Pioneer Cemetery
Irving Hill Road and Constant Avenue
Lawrence, KS

Chancellor Franklin Murphy and his two daughters “rediscovered” Pioneer Cemetery during a spring 1952 walk on undeveloped property west of Iowa Street and south of Irving Hill Road.

His interest piqued, he asked the KU Endowment Association to negotiate with the City of Lawrence to acquire the land, which the association did for $1 in May 1953.

Artwork
Pioneer, The
South of Fraser Hall
Lawrence, KS

Frederick C. Hibbard, 1904

The first sculpture on campus, The Pioneer was a 1905 gift of Simeon B. Bell of Wyandotte County, Kan., a physician and real-estate speculator. In memory of his late wife, Bell donated land and funding for the Eleanor Taylor Bell Memorial Hospital in Kansas City, Kan., which became the University of Kansas School of Medicine and the University of Kansas Hospital.

Artwork
Prairie Formation
East of Blake Hall
Lawrence, KS

James Bass, 1981

When Topeka artist James Bass (b. 1933) created this welded bronze piece, he said, he was endeavoring “to reconcile the visual landscape of the 20th century with the textures and forms of the Kansas landscape.” The piece, 7 feet 2 inches tall and almost 4 feet wide, was donated by the Pi Deuteron chapter of Phi Gamma Delta to commemorate its centennial May 2, 1981.

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